Sustainability

The following quotation is from the book "Sustainable Preservation: Greening Existing Building" by Jean Carroon:

"No description of a sustainable world can avoid addressing the completely unsustainable way in which 'developed' countries carelessly use and dispose of materials. Throw-away cultural norms apply as directly to buildings and their components as they do to plastic bottles. Current economic structure and cultural attitudes support new over old replacement of repair. A sustainable approach takes an entirely different tack. A sustainable world values stewardship, repairability, and durability because a sustainable world recognizes that every new object has substantial but hidden environmental costs, including health impacts, that may be irreversible.”

Economics, Sustainability, and Historic Preservation, an article by Donovan Rypkema on the website Preservation North Carolina, argues for the preservation of original windows and makes the case for historic preservation as sustainable development.

Issues in Preservation - leaders in the field need comprehensive, professional-level analysis of the most pressing issues of historic preservation. Find up-to-date, high-level information on topics such as ReUrbanism and Sustainability from the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Should your Old Wood Windows Be Saved? by Rob Yagid. This article in the magazine Fine Home Building weighs the options with cost, complexity, efficiency, and preservation in mind. 

The Right Thing - Green Windows and Window Restoration, what are the facts and myths of the replace vs. restore historic windows debate?

Guidelines for Preservation and Replacement of Historic Wood Windows - from old-growth lumber, careful construction and craftsmanship, and easily repairable. The retention of original components.

The Real Cost of Removing Historic Windows - what replacement windows can't replace